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A character may carry around other objects in addition to any weapons and armor; in general these other objects are classified as equipment. Equipment can include gear for adventuring in different types of terrain, tools, kits, everyday items and so forth. The effect of a piece of equipment usually comes into play only in certain specific situations but having it available at the right time can make the difference between success and failure.

As with weapons and armor, it is assumed that all of the equipment listed in this sub-Chapter are generic, medium-sized pieces of equipment. It is possible for pieces of equipment to be modified, enhanced or to come in a size suited for sapient beings that are substantially larger or smaller than Terrans. The same general list of modifiers that may be applied to weaponry and armor (age, rarity, quality and size) can also be applied to various forms of equipment at a GM's discretion.

Encumbrance and Pockets

While it might be nice if a character could carry everything possible all at one time and be prepared for any contingency they might face as a result (particularly from the standpoint of a player), the truth of the matter is that this optimistic state of affairs simply isn't realistic; stuff takes up space and has weight. Sooner or later, a character hauling around enough crap will get to the point where its combined weight is going to affect their abilities. This effect is known to all experienced role-players by that foulest of words, encumbrance.

Encumbrance in WCRPG is handled through the use of "pockets". Pockets are any item or device that allows a player to carry an item without the use of a "motor appendage" (more on motor appendages later). A pocket can also be referred to as a container; any object that has pockets is known as a container object. Container objects include items such as backpacks, sacks, purses, luggage, utility belts and holsters. Pockets sewn into clothes also count as containers and as a result the most common class of container objects in the WC universe are articles of clothing, which are listed among the equipment presented in this sub-Chapter. The number of pockets a character receives from a container object is listed with that object's stats.

Pockets are given ratings in units of slots based upon their relative size; each available slot in a pocket correlates to a volume of 50 cubic centimeters of internal space. All of the pockets used to store an object must belong to the same container object and it must have enough available slots to store the object; the container may not be used to carry an object if these conditions are not fulfilled. A pocket may hold as many objects as its overall size will allow.

Additionally, all objects have an encumbrance class (EC) that factors in their size and weight; the combined ECs of all of the objects a character is carrying is called their encumbrance total or total encumbrance class (TEC). For example, a Terran character is carrying Field Binoculars, a Laser Pistol, an Environmental Scanner and a PDA. The field binoculars have an EC of 8, the laser has an EC of 3, the scanner 4 and the PDA 2; their encumbrance total is therefore 17 (8+3+4+2 = 17). Container objects are assumed to have an EC of zero unless otherwise noted. Some items are so heavy by themselves that they have additional HD/THD and Finesse Skill penalties; where an added penalty applies, it will be so noted. A character whose TEC is less than their Power score suffers no penalties for encumbrance. If a character's TEC is greater than their Power score but less than 1½ times that amount (rounded down), they are burdened, can only move at half of their base rate and cannot run faster than three times their base speed. Further, they take a -10 DC penalty to all Physical Checks (all Power, Finesse and Physique Checks). A character whose load is between 1½ and two times their Power score is strained and cannot run faster than twice their base speed, with the Physical Check DC penalty increasing to -25. When a character's TEC is twice their Power score or greater, they are so overloaded with stuff that they cannot move under any circumstances and automatically fail all Physical Checks. Penalties for carrying specific objects apply regardless of whether the item is being carried by a motor appendage or in a pocket.

When purchasing items for their characters (including weapons and some forms of Armor such as Shields), players should specify the container object in which they plan to carry the object. This will make it easier for a GM to determine changes in a character's TEC if they should happen to drop the specific container object. It also tends to make it easier to determine when exactly that container is full.

Note that a character may wear Armor over their clothing and may wear some pieces of clothing that are designed to fit over other pieces (such as a coat). Objects may still be carried in pockets that will be physically covered by other pieces of clothing or armor, provided that they are placed in the pockets before the character adds the outer clothing/Armor layer. Objects in pockets covered by outer layers may not be accessed without first removing the covering layer first unless otherwise noted. Objects that can be worn over clothes and Armor will usually be so noted (items such as weapons holsters, belts and backpacks are usually assumed to be worn over clothing and Armor without any notation).

A Quick Word about Body Parts and Pockets

Regardless of their species, all characters in WCRPG have various bodily areas; perhaps unsurprisingly, these areas are collectively known as body parts. The nature of these areas largely determines how a species behaves biologically and can have some in-game effects. Body parts correspond to the same areas on a character's body that can take damage in combat (see Chapter 9.2).

The Wing Commander Universe contains a small number of non-humanoid species. Because of the need to represent a dichotomy of both humanoid and non-humanoid species, the names given to body parts in WCRPG are somewhat vague; because it is assumed that most of WCRPG's players will be Terrans in real-life, Terran frames of reference are used whenever it is deemed necessary. The following is a brief overview of body parts in WCRPG and how pockets tend to be used with them.

Cognitive Organs are what enables a character to think and to control their life processes; the Terran equivalent would be the brain and spinal column. Related to this bodily section are Sensory Organs including eyes, ears, noses, antennae, infrared pits, etc., which are used to provide the character with sensory information about their surroundings. In general, these organs are so crucial to a lifeform's very existence that their performance is best left unimpeded; no container objects are usually made to be carried on these areas, though certain pieces of gear (such as sunglasses, hearing aids, nose plugs, etc.) can be set for use with these areas directly without the need for pockets. A piece of equipment that can be used in this manner will be so noted in its description.

Motor Appendages (more properly called "motor-control appendages") include arms, tentacles, prehensile vines or anything else that a lifeform uses for the purpose of manipulating objects; for Terrans, this includes either complete arm assembly from the shoulder all the way down to the fingertips. They may be used to directly "store" an object that isn't being used; in this case the object is considered to be "carried in hand". A character is allowed to carry one item per motor appendage unless the item specifically states that it requires the use of multiple appendages. If an item requires more appendages than the character currently has available for its use, the character cannot use the item though they are still allowed to carry it. Particularly large or heavy objects may be carried by multiple characters; any penalties that come from carrying such an item are shared equally by all of the characters carrying it. A motor appendage can have an additional pocket or two added to it from clothing and the "shoulder" (the part of a motor appendage that directly attaches to a lifeform's body area) can itself be used to carry certain pieces of gear with straps directly (including items such as purses, backpacks, satchel charges and so forth). Heavy items stored in a motor appendage pocket will make it more difficult for a character to utilize the appendage; if an item stored in a motor appendage pocket has an HD penalty associated with it, it will inflict an equal DC penalty to all of the character's Finesse Checks.

Propulsive Appendages include legs, tentacles, prehensile root structures or anything else whose purpose is to enable a lifeform to move. Propulsive appendages may have some pockets added to them from clothing. A heavy item stored in a propulsive appendage pocket may make it more difficult for a character to move quickly; if an item stored in a motor appendage pocket has an HD penalty associated with it, the item inflicts an equal DC penalty to all of the character's Finesse Checks and will also reduce their base movement speed by one-tenth of the same amount.

Reproductive Organs include any kind of gonadal structure or genitalia used in order for a lifeform to procreate. Typically, putting any kind of additional weight on these structures results in a marked drop in the lifeform's overall performance (get your mind out of the gutter, you pervert) not to mention severe pain and the organ's possible permanent dysfunction. The reproductive organs are like sensory organs in that in general no pockets are usually added to them though a creative and somewhat repressed GM may come up with some pieces of equipment that may be set for use in these areas directly. Penalties associated with combat damage to the reproductive organ areas may be applied to any object being carried in the same area; for details, see Chapter 9.2.

Finally, the Body Area constitutes the remainder of the lifeform's internal volume, containing the majority of the vital internal organs and the lifeform's center of mass (assuming it's symmetrical); for a Terran, this would include the torso area down to the waist. Typically, most of the pockets added to a character via their gear will be in this area of their body. There are two particularly important parts of the body area that deserve special attention: the "waist" and the "back". The waist area can be used as a mounting point for equipment such as belts. All characters are allowed to wear one belt of any type; for some species, this may be the only way they can haul any gear whatsoever. The back is required to haul larger pieces of equipment including large satchel charges, backpacks, flammable gas canisters and so forth. When carrying objects on the back, two of the character's "shoulders" are also used; other objects can be simultaneously mounted on the same shoulders. Finally, a character may have a holster for a weapon that requires multiple appendages to use mounted on their back at the same time they have another object mounted there.

Equipment

The following section lists specific pieces of character equipment by category. While most of these categories will have their own set of statistics, there are a few pieces of data that are common them; these are known as basic stats and consist of the following items:

  • Category: This lists the specific category into which a given piece of equipment fits. When an effect is universal to every item in the category, it will be so noted.
  • Name: This is the name given to the specific piece of equipment.
  • Availability: This lists the minimal technological level a culture must achieve before the equipment will become available for its general use. Note that any piece of equipment may be used by any member of any species; this just lists when a species may start making if for themselves.
  • Cost: This lists the general cost of the equipment in credits assuming average quality and level market conditions.
  • EC: This lists the equipment's encumbrance class, which counts towards the TEC of any character carrying it.
  • Size: This lists the size of the equipment in slots.
  • Appendages: This lists the number of appendages required to use the equipment.
  • Description: This gives a generic description of the equipment; if it has any special qualities or effects, they will be listed here.

Any changes to the usage of these basic stats will be indicated in a given category's general overview along with any additional stats specifically used by it. 

Clothing and Container Objects

As explained above, the primary function of clothing and container objects is to provide a character with additional pockets, which determine how much stuff they can carry at any given time. Clothing is fairly ubiquitous amongst sentient races; nudity is taboo in many cultures, although what level of surface exposure constitutes it is another matter entirely. All characters are assumed to have at least one outfit at the time of their creation that's appropriate to the role they play in their society, unless the GM has a good reason for letting them run around naked. All clothing listed herein becomes available in Metal Age societies unless expressly stated otherwise. Because containers are used primarily for holding other objects, they have a pockets statistic instead of a size statistic; this lists the number of pockets that come with the container as well as the number of slots in each individual pocket. Containers also have a listing for mountpoints; this statistic indicates the part of the body on which the container is designed to be worn. Clothing in particular always goes on underneath other objects that may share the same mount point. Containers otherwise use the basic stats.

Clothing and Container Objects
Name Cost EC Pockets Mountpoint Description
Military Dress Uniform ¤72.60 0 1x64†,3x4 Body Area Outfit. A military uniform designed to be worn for ceremonies such as change of command, retirement, commissioning and decommissioning or when otherwise appropriate. Consists of a dress shirt, dress pants or skirt, dress socks and shoes, belt, hat with service insignia and dress jacket to which is affixed all service insignia and adornments. Usually comes with a sword belt, which is included in the cost.
Military Service Uniform ¤32.25 0 1x8†,4x4 Body Area Outfit. A military uniform designed to be worn in office environments, in positions that interact with the public and in watch situations. Typically consists of a duty dress shirt to which is affixed service insignia and ribbons, dress pants or skirt, dress shoes, dress socks and duty holster belt.
Military Working Uniform ¤25.00 0 3x8†,2x4,8x2 Body Area Outfit. A military uniform designed to be worn in the field as well as industrial environments. Typically consists of a plain color undershirt and underwear (the color of which may serve to denote a service member's specialty), a one piece coverall to which is affixed service all insignia, boots and a utility duty holster that holds one single-appendaged weapon. Often worn with an informal hat such as a ballcap.
Civilian Formal Dress ¤65.00 0 1x2 Body Area Outfit. A set of civilian garments designed to be worn on very formal occasions such as proms, cotillions, weddings as a participant, etc. In Terran terms, this would be the equivalent of a full tuxedo (ruffled shirt, cummerbund, formal pants, dress socks and shoes, underwear, overcoat with tails, bow tie, cufflinks and a top hat) or dress ball gown (full length dress with or without petticoat, dress shoes, underwear, hose, garter and possibly some manner of luxury headwear such as a tiara).
Civilian Casual Dress ¤25.00 0 5x4,2x2 Body Area Outfit. A set of civilian garments designed to be worn in professional environments or semi-formal occasions such as graduations, funerals, religious services, weddings as a non-participant, etc. Includes a pocketed long-sleeved button-up shirt or blouse, pocketed dress pants or skirt, dress jacket and undergarments. Usually also includes a necktie or ribbon. Dress shoes will still be needed for this outfit.
Civilian Street Casual ¤9.75 0 4x4,1x2 Body Area Outfit. A set of civilian garments designed to be worn as general everyday clothing. Includes a pocketless, short-sleeved t-shirt and jeans combo as well as undergarments. Separate shoes will still be needed for this outfit.
Arctic Wear ¤241.95 1 6x8,4x4,2x2 Full Body Industrial Age. A full body suit designed to be worn in extremely cold weather conditions. Includes a sweater, over-pants, gloves, mittens, over-gloves, heavy thermal boots and a heavy coat. The suit provides three levels of thermal protection for the entire body. Inflicts a +5 penalty to HD/THD and a -1 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks when worn.
Raingear ¤11.25 1 2x16 Body Area† A specialized suit made of materials that include at least one layer that is relatively impermeable to water. The material is designed such that the wearer can still remain relatively cool while being protected from adverse weather conditions. The price listed is for a combination raincoat, hat and pants.
Swimwear ¤3.25 0 None Body Area† A very light garment designed to streamline the flow of water around a being's body, usually worn in social situations wherein total nudity while swimming is taboo or illegal. Usually covers only a portion of the wearer's Body Area and their Reproductive Organs; some models only cover the Reproductive Organs. Use of swimwear is for casual occasions; there is no such thing as formal swimwear, though athletic swimming teams may have matching "uniforms". The price listed is for a single-piece suit.
Fire Fighting Gear ¤3,225.00 12 None Full Body Industrial Age. A suit designed to offer full body protection from fire and sources of extreme heat. The suit includes a fire-retardant jacket and pants, gloves, self-contained breathing apparatus with transparent face mask (small Oxygen Tank equivalent), heavy boots and a hard waterproof hat (Second Class Helmet equivalent). It also typically includes a hand axe (First Class Axe equivalent). Provides heat protection (three levels) and prevents burns from all sources except Laser-based weaponry. Inflicts a +5 penalty to HD/THD and a -1 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks when worn.
Diving Gear ¤219.50 3 8x2 Full Body A set of equipment designed to be used in water at shallow to moderate depths. Includes a wetsuit, a rebreather with face mask, a pair of swimming fins and a utility belt. The suit allows its wearer to remain submerged at depths up to 100 meters for periods up to six hours, including some time to decompress from lower depths. Any underwater movement penalties are ignored while wearing this gear.
Pressure Suit ¤64,520.00 20 4x16 Full Body Industrial Age. A small sealed frame resembling a suit of physical armor with elaborate pressure joints to allow articulation while maintaining suitable internal pressure. The suit allows its wearer to remain submerged at depths up to 700 meters for periods of up to 48 hours without requiring decompression before resurfacing. The suit also allows the wearer to remain in total vacuum for periods of up to 48 hours. Industrial Age suits are heavy and bulky; they inflict a +20 HD/THD penalty and -5 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks when worn. Starfaring Age suits reduce the penalties to +10 HD/THD and -2 DC to Finesse; they cost ¤32,260.00. The suit acts as a full suit of Third Class Armor. If it is reduced to zero AHP, the suit is breached.
Shirt (Short Sleeved) ¤1.60† 0 None† Body Area An article of clothing designed to be worn on the upper part of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the Body Area only. This kind of shirt is meant to be worn on informal occasions or in warmer climates. The price listed is for an un-pocketed shirt; a shirt can have up to two 2-slot pockets, with each adding ¤0.25 to the cost.
Shirt (Long Sleeved) ¤3.25† 0 None† Body Area An article of clothing designed to be worn on the upper part of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the Body Area as well as most of the wearer's Motor Appendages. This kind of shirt is meant to be worn in more formal occasions or in cooler climates. The price listed is for an un-pocketed shirt; a shirt can have up to two 2-slot pockets, with each adding ¤0.25 to the cost.
Shorts ¤3.25 0 None† Waist (Body Area) Industrial Age. An article of clothing designed to be worn on the lower portions of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the area around the Reproductive Organs. This kind of covering is meant to be worn in very informal occasions and in particularly warm ambient conditions. The price listed is for an un-pocketed pair of shorts; shorts can have up to four 2-slot pockets or two 4-slot pockets.  Each 2-slot pocket adds ¤0.25 and each 4-slot pocket adds ¤0.65 to the cost.
Skirt ¤3.25 0 None† Waist (Body Area) An article of clothing designed to be worn on the lower portions of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the area around the Reproductive Organs and part of the Propulsive Appendages. Skirts do not form-fit a being as do pants and shorts. This kind of covering can be worn in many different types of occasions and is generally best worn in warm ambient conditions. The price listed is for an un-pocketed skirt; a skirt can have up to two 4-slot pockets, with each adding ¤0.65 to the cost.
Pants ¤5.00 0 None† Waist (Body Area) An article of clothing designed to be worn on the lower portions of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the area around the Reproductive Organs and the Propulsive Appendages. This kind of covering is meant to be worn in semi-formal occasions or in cooler ambient conditions. The price listed is for an un-pocketed pair of pants; pants can have up to four 4-slot pockets and one 2-slot pockets. Each 2-slot pocket adds ¤0.25 and each 4-slot pocket adds ¤0.65 to the cost.
Jeans ¤8.00 0 4x4, 1x2† Waist (Body Area) An article of clothing designed to be worn on the lower portions of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the area around the Reproductive Organs and the Propulsive Appendages. This kind of covering is meant to be worn for casual occasions, though nicer pairs may be worn for semi-formal ones. They're typically made of a thick material; they add one level of thermal protection. Jeans may have two 8-slot pockets substituted for two of the 4-slot pockets; each 8-slot pocket adds ¤0.65 to the cost.
Cargo Pants ¤6.50 0 4x8, 1x2† Waist (Body Area) An article of clothing designed to be worn on the lower portions of a humanoid body, which typically covers up the area around the Reproductive Organs and the Propulsive Appendages. This kind of covering usually has higher carrying capacity when compared to pants and can be worn in many of the same situations. Cargo pants can include up to four more 2-slot or 4-slot pockets; each 2-slot pocket adds ¤0.25 and each 4-slot pocket adds ¤0.65 to the cost.
Hat ¤3.25 0 None Head (Cognitive Organ) An article of clothing designed to be worn on a humanoid head, which typically covers up the area around the being's Cognitive Organ. It may provide some protection for the being's Auditory and Visual Organs depending upon their placement and design; most hats provide one level of thermal protection.
Shoes ¤5.00 0 None Propulsive Appendages An article of clothing designed to be worn on the far end of a being's Propulsive Appendages, which is designed to protect them against light terrain hazards such as rocks and burrs. There are many different types of shoes; usually only certain types are considered appropriate for certain occasions. Some beings go so far as to have specific pairs of shoes for specific outfits in their wardrobes. The price listed is for a single matching pair of shoes.
Boots ¤6.50 0 None Propulsive Appendages An article of clothing designed to be worn on the far end of a being's Propulsive Appendages. Boots are a toughened form of Shoe designed to provide additional protection. Most are meant to be worn in cold weather, combat and/or wilderness conditions. Most boots provide one level of thermal protection. The price listed is for a matching pair of boots.
Gloves ¤3.25 1 None Motor Appendages An article of clothing designed to be worn on the far end of a being's Motor Appendages. Gloves are designed to provide a protective layer between the being's fine manipulators and the outside environment. Though sometimes worn in fine society, they are more often used as barrier protection in garages, machine shops, hospitals and other critical care facilities or as thermal protection in outdoor settings (this last type of glove provides one level of thermal protection). The price listed is for one pair of gloves.
Sweater ¤5.00 0 None† Body Area An article of cold-weather clothing designed to be worn on the upper part of the humanoid body, which typically covers up the Body Area and most of the wearer's Motor Appendages. Sweaters are meant to be worn over Shirts as a means of providing extra thermal protection (one level). The price listed is for an un-pocketed sweater; up to two 2-slot pockets may be added for an additional ¤0.25 to the cost.
Coat ¤6.50 1 3x4† Body Area An article of cold-weather clothing designed to be worn on the upper part of the humanoid body, which typically covers up the Body Area and most of the wearer's Motor Appendages. Coats are meant to be worn over Shirts and Sweaters as a means of providing thermal protection in sub-freezing temperatures (one level of thermal protection). Coats may have up to four additional 8-slot pockets; each adds ¤1.00 to the cost. Coats may be fitted over Armor.
Heavy Coat ¤8.00 2 4x8, 4x4, 1x2 Body Area An article of extremely cold-weather clothing designed to be worn on the upper part of the humanoid body, which typically covers up the Body Area most of the wearer's Motor Appendages. Coats are meant to be worn over Shirts and Sweaters as a means of providing maximum thermal protection in subfreezing temperatures (two levels of thermal protection). Heavy coats may be fitted over Armor. They inflict a -2 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks.
Duty (Hip) Holster ¤9.75 0 1x8† Waist (Body Area) A belt which contains a special pocket designed to carry a single one-appendaged weapon or a deployed energy shield. The pocket has a clasp that is designed to keep the weapon from falling out or being drawn by anyone other than its wielder. For non-weapon objects, the pocket is useless. Multiple-appendaged weapons can be stowed in this type of holster; add ¤1.50 to the cost for each added appendage needed by the weapon and multiply the available number of slots by eight. This particular type of holster allows the weapon to be drawn from the lower body area (around the area of the humanoid hip) and is designed to be worn over Armor and clothing.
Ankle Holster ¤6.50 0 1x8† Propulsive Appendage A strap which contains a special pocket designed to carry a single one-appendaged weapon or a deployed energy shield. The pocket has a clasp that is designed to keep the weapon from falling out. For non-weapon objects, the pocket is useless. This particular type of holster allows a weapon to be carried in the lower area of a Propulsive Appendage and is designed to be worn under clothing.
Trouser Holster ¤5.00 0 1x8† Waist (Body Area) A special pocket designed to hold a single one-appendaged weapon or a deployed energy shield; it can clip to a belt thus allowing the weapon to be concealed inside a pair of Pants. The pocket has a clasp that is designed to keep the weapon from falling out or being drawn by anyone other than its wielder. For non-weapon objects, the pocket is useless. This particular type of holster allows the weapon to be stowed and drawn from the lower Body Area and is designed to be worn under clothing.
Shoulder Holster ¤11.95 0 1x8† Shoulder (Motor Appendage) A set of straps to which is attach a special pocket designed to carry a single one-appendaged weapon or a deployed energy shield. The straps are designed to be worn like a backpack and can be worn underneath one. The pocket has a clasp that is designed to keep the weapon from falling out. For non-weapon objects, the pocket is useless. This particular type of holster allows the weapon to be stowed in the upper portion of a Motor Appendage and may be worn either over or under clothing and/or Armor.
Pocket Holster ¤4.20 0 1x8† Varies† A special pocket insert designed to convert a normal pocket into a holster for a single one-appendaged weapon rated First or Second Class (but not a deployed energy shield). The pocket has a clasp that is designed to keep the weapon from falling out. If a weapon is being carried in this kind of holster, the corresponding pocket may not carry other objects. This particular type of holster can be placed in any pocket that has at least eight slots regardless of its position on the body.
Back Holster ¤8.00 0 1x8† Back (Body Area) A baldric to which a special pocket designed to hold a single weapon or a deployed energy shield is attached. For non-weapon objects, the pocket is useless. Multiple-appendaged weapons can be stowed in this type of holster; add ¤1.75 to the cost for each added appendage needed by the weapon and multiply the available number of slots by eight. The size of the pocket will be proportionately bigger as well. This particular type of holster allows a weapon to be stowed in the middle of the back and is designed to be worn over clothing and armor; it may be worn either over or under anything else the wearer is carrying on their back.
Backpack (Academic) ¤6.50 1 2x128,4x64 Back (Body Area) Industrial Age. A medium-sized polyester sack designed to hold a large number of textbooks and other school supplies. Each pocket comes with a zipper to help protect the sack's contents from the elements. It also comes with straps for mounting on the wearer's shoulders and an additional handle for direct Motor Appendage carrying.
Backpack (Wilderness) ¤22.60 3 1x512,1x128, 5x64, 2x32 Back (Body Area) A large, multi-pocketed sack and frame assembly designed to enable its wearer to carry a large number of supplies and pieces of field equipment. Comes with straps for mounting on the wearer's shoulders as well as a belt to prevent the pack from causing too much strain. The sack portion may either be made out of cloth with grommet fasteners or advanced polymers with zippers depending upon the period of manufacture. It inflicts a -2 DC penalty to all of the wearer's Finesse Checks.
Sack (Plastic) ¤4.25 0 1x128† Motor Appendage Industrial Age. A bag made from polyethylene resin open at one end with handles for easy carrying. It can be folded down into a much smaller shape (2 slots) for storage. The cost listed is for 100 units.
Sack (Paper) ¤0.65 0 1x1024† Motor Appendage Industrial Age. A very large sack shaped like a rectangular prism with one short end missing. The sack is made of 3-ply durable paper capable of handling a significant amount of internal weight. It may or may not have handles; non-handled sacks will impose a -1 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks while they are being carried. It can be folded down into a much smaller shape (8 slots) for storage. The cost listed is for a single sack.
Satchel ¤8.00 0 1x128 Shoulder (Motor Appendage) A large amorphous or hardened rectangular sack made out of durable cloth or leather. It usually has an adjustable strap designed to allow the sack to be slung onto a shoulder and it seals with a zipper. The cost listed is for a single satchel.
Briefcase ¤6.50 0 1x64 Motor Appendage A medium-sized rectangular case made out of durable cloth or leather. It incorporates a hard grip for carrying and seals with a zipper. The cost listed is for a single briefcase.
Suitcase ¤11.25 1 1x1024, 1x16 Motor Appendage A very large, hard, plastic-based fabric case with a leather grip for carrying. It seals with a zipper that runs along the perimeter of the pockets. It also has a separate, smaller outer pocket. If packed carefully, a suitcase can carry a wardrobe for a single person for up to two weeks. While being carried, the suitcase inflicts a -4 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks. Some models come with an extendable handle and wheels; they add ¤1.50 to the cost but reduce the Finesse DC penalty to -1.
Hip Pack ¤3.25 0 1x64, 1x4 Waist (Body Area) A medium-sized circular or amorphous cloth bag designed to attach to a body using an adjustable belt. The belt is designed to fit over clothing and Armor. Both pockets seal with zippers.
Utility Belt ¤8.00 0 8x4 Waist (Body Area) A belt that has a number of small pouches and loops attached to it; each pouch has a button clasp that is designed to hold in its contents. The belt is designed to fit over clothing and armor. Some Utility Belts include a Duty Holster (which adds ¤3.25 to the cost, adds a 1x8 holster and removes 2x4 pockets).
Armor Enhancement Suit ¤161.25 0 None† Body Area Starfaring Age. A specialized combination shirt and pants designed to fit underneath physical armor plating. The materials inside the suit's fiber serve to amplify the strength of the wearer's movements, effectively counteracting any loss of mobility due to the weight of Armor. The suit imparts a -10 HD/THD bonus as well as a +4 DC bonus to its wearer's Finesse Checks; these bonuses are imparted whether the wearer is actually wearing Armor or not.

Tools and Wilderness Gear

Tools are devices that provide either a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task or an ability that is not naturally available to its user; the vast majority of useful objects fall into this broad category. Related to tools are pieces of wilderness gear, which are include tools that are generally meant to be used in planetary environments outside of urban areas. Tools and Wilderness Gear utilize the basic stats only.

Tools and Wilderness Gear
Name Availability Cost EC Size Appendages Description
Duct Tape (Mini Roll) Industrial Age ¤0.65 0 1 One A 250 centimeter-long roll of adhesive tape with heavy tensile strength. It can be cut into strips to conduct temporary repair work. Adds a +5 DC bonus to all Damage Control Checks when utilized for repairs.
Duct Tape (Large Roll) Industrial Age ¤6.50 4 16 One A 60 meter-long roll of adhesive tape with heavy tensile strength. It can be cut into strips to conduct temporary repair work. Adds a +5 DC bonus to all Damage Control Checks when utilized for repairs.
Mechanical Lubricant Industrial Age ¤1.50 3 8 One A pressurized 350 milliliter can that contains a cleaner, lubricant and anti-corrosive solution designed to deliver it to a specific area as an aerosol. The can comes with a plastic tube for precision application to a particular area. Can be used for a variety of purposes (GM's discretion). Adds a +5 DC bonus to any Engineering Check when utilized for repairs.
Acid Vial Metal Age ¤2.25 2 4 One† A 500 milliliter glass vial of moderately concentrated acid (default hydrochloric acid). It can be thrown like a grenade for 1d5 Acid Damage or higher at the GM's discretion; for details, see Chapter 12.3. In addition to its potential use as a weapon, a vial of acid can be used in many different situations such as trying to pick a mechanical lock, neutralizing a caustic substance, cleaning off a badly corroded item and so forth. Use of a vial of acid may impart favorable conditions on a Skill Check (+10 DC bonus) at the GMs discretion. GMs should use their judgment as to whether an Acid Vial requires multiple appendages when applied to a task.
Engineering Toolkit Starfaring Age ¤1,935.50 8 256 One† A metallic case containing various tools and equipment designed for use in engineering applications aboard capital ships; it typically includes items such as Duct Tape, Mechanical Lubricant, specialized tools such as plasma torches and molecular re-synthesizers, an Environmental Scanner modified for engineering applications and a PDA or Tablet Computer. Provides the materials required for a ship's Engineer to perform any kind of significant repair or maintenance work.
Lock-Picking Kit (Mechanical) Metal Age ¤16.10 2 4 Two A stethoscope, a set of hooks and various other tools packaged in a relatively small casing. It can be used to pick mechanical locks such as catch-hooks and deadbolts; its use adds a +10 DC bonus to any Dexterous Maneuvers Check made to pick a mechanical lock.
Lock-Picking Kit (Electronic) Industrial Age ¤24.25 3 8 Two Requires a Small Battery; uses one charge every minute operational. A wrist computer, thumb print reader and complex false retinal pattern imager all packaged together in a relatively small casing. It can be used to pick electronic locks; it adds a +10 DC bonus to any Cunning Check made to pick an electronic lock.
Pencil Metal Age ¤0.25† 0 1† One A non-refillable wood-encased carbon-graphite rod sharpened to a fine point on one end. It includes a small piece of rubber on the other end. The graphite rod can be used to leave physical marks on surfaces, while the rubber end may be used to expunge any such marks made. The price listed is for a box of eight pencils (2 slots). Their primary function is to leave marks on paper but they can be used for any number of purposes at the discretion of the player or GM.
Mechanical Pencil Industrial Age ¤7.50† 0 1† One A refillable plastic-encased carbon-graphite rod. The rod has been pushed out a small hole on one end via an internal mechanism. It includes a holder for a piece of rubber on the other end. Mechanical Pencils function in the same manner as normal Pencils. The price listed is for a box of six pencils (2 slots); refill leads (0 EC; 1 slot; box of 12) cost ¤0.25.
Paper Metal Age ¤0.25 4 16 One A piece of flattened material made from vegetable fibers composed of cellulose, designed to be marked upon in situations wherein use of a non-electronic medium is necessary. Paper comes in a tablet of 100 sheets and can be used for a variety of purposes at the discretion of the players and GM. When writing or leaving a message, a piece of paper provides a +5 DC bonus to any Intimidation or Knowledge Check wherein the information on the paper is relevant to the situation. Paper can also be used to help start a fire; it imparts a +10 DC bonus to any Survival Check made to light a fire.
Journalist Notepad Metal Age ¤2.60 2 4 One A pad of 200 small Paper sheets ink-lined in a ruled or orthogonal grid pattern and encased in a hardened leather binding. The inside of the binding comes with a small pocket (1 slot) for the storage of very small objects. It can be used for a variety of purposes at the discretion of the players and GM. When writing or leaving a message, a piece of paper provides a +5 DC bonus to any Intimidation or Knowledge Check wherein the information on the paper is relevant to the situation. Paper can be torn out and used to help start a fire; it imparts a+5 DC bonus to any Survival Check made to light a fire.
Audio Recorder Industrial Age ¤85.50 4 16 One Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge every minute while operational. A rectangular box containing an apparatus that is designed to capture audio waves via a microphone attachment and record them onto a small recording disc (1 slot; box of 3; costs ¤1.50). It comes with a shoulder strap for easy carrying (shoulder mount). It provides audio recording capabilities for up to one hour, after which time a new disc will be required.
Video Recorder Industrial Age ¤193.50 4 16 One Requires Large Battery; uses one charge every thirty seconds while operational. A hand-held apparatus designed to capture sequences of images and accompanying sound and to store those images on a Memory Stick. It comes with a shoulder strap for easy carrying (shoulder mount) and provides visual recording for up to two hours before needing a data dump (requires any Computer).
Field Recorder Starfaring Age ¤209.75 3 8 None* Requires Large Battery; uses one charge every five minutes while operational. A self-propelled repulsor device equipped with a full camera mount. It can record in visual and infrared spectrums and provides visual recording for up to 6 hours before needing a data dump (requires any Computer). It also comes with a 1 slot, EC0 remote control and can be set to directly transmit its data; power usage increases to one charge every thirty seconds in this mode.
Holographic Recorder Starfaring Age ¤1,250.00 3 8 None* Requires Large Battery; uses one charge every five minutes while operational. A self-propelled repulsor device designed to capture three-dimensional sequences of images with accompanying sound and store them onto a Data Crystal. It comes with a 1 slot, EC0 remote control and generally includes a conversion module for HXS disks and provides high-definition, three-dimensional visual recording for up to six hours before a data dump (requires any Computer).
Thermos Bottle Industrial Age ¤2.25 4 16 One A domestic vacuum-insulated flask with a metallic exterior and a handle for gripping. Its lid may be used as a cup. It holds up to one liter of liquid at its current temperature for up to seven hours.
Oxygen Tank (Small) Industrial Age ¤123.00 5 32 None A portable O2 canister; it provides thirty minutes worth of air at a rate of one liter per minute. It comes with its own belt (belt requires waist mount) and a recharge unit.
Oxygen Tank (Large) Industrial Age ¤23.25 9 512 One A portable O2 canister; it provides ninety minutes worth of oxygen at a rate of up to four liters per minute. It comes with a wheeled cart for portability; it Inflicts a +3 HD/THD penalty when carried.
Trash Incinerator Starfaring Age ¤39.75 8 256 One* A metallic box with hinged door on the top. It comes with a separate, collapsible tripod mount. Once set on the mount, the user can place trash inside the box until it is full and press a button to activate it. Anything placed inside the box is instantly flash-incinerated. The user must wait one minute after use before storing or re-using the device as its exterior gets hot enough to cause burns during the incineration process (it inflicts 1d10 Basic Damage and two Wounds if touched before it has a chance to cool).
Compact Field Binoculars Industrial Age ¤17.75 6 64 One† A set of dual telescoping lenses set into a metal and hard-plastic casing, designed to allow its user to see objects clearly at a distance. The lenses are coated with special chemicals to prevent fogging and dust contamination, while porro prism mirrors are used to reduce undesired reflection. It comes with a manual adjustment wheel that enables the user to see a sixty degree field of vision clearly at a range of one hundred meters, or less clearly at larger distances. It comes with a shoulder strap and case for carrying as well as caps for the exterior lenses when not in use.
Field Binoculars Metal Age ¤42.90 8 256 Two A set of dual telescoping lenses set into a metal and hard-plastic casing, designed to allow its user to see clearly at a distance. The lenses are coated with special chemicals to prevent fogging and dust contamination, while roof mirrors are used to reduce undesired reflection. A rubber armor exterior protects the device from damage if it is accidentally dropped. It comes with a manual adjustment wheel enabling the user to see an eighty-five degree field of vision clearly at a range of one kilometer, or less clearly at larger distances. It comes with a shoulder strap and case for carrying as well as caps for the exterior lenses when not in use.
Field Multi-Spectral Goggles Starfaring Age ¤96.75 5 32 None† Requires Sensory Organ Mount. A set of goggles that include optical instruments whose purpose is to allow images to be produced in levels of light approaching total darkness. Image intensifiers in the device change all ambient EM wavelengths into a range detectable by the user; a sensor shuts off the intensifier if the ambient EM becomes high enough to overload the device. It allows the wearer full vision in conditions in which they would not ordinarily be able to see and includes the ability to manually see a one hundred degree field of vision clearly at a range of one kilometer; less clearly at ranges beyond that.
Toiletry Kit Industrial Age ¤5.50 6 64 One A medium-sized cloth bag designed to carry toiletry items for travel. A typical kit for a Terran may include such items as a comb, small hairbrush, astringent, cotton balls, wipes, a collapsible toothbrush, toothpaste, razors, shaving cream, deodorant, 2-in-1 shampoo and soap or body wash. It generally holds enough of these items for up to five contiguous days of use. The effects of toiletry kits may vary at the GM's discretion; any DC penalties from their lack of use should be limited to Charm Skills.
Mess Kit Metal Age ¤6.50 7 128 One A rudimentary set of aluminum cookware designed to nest together for easy storage and transportation. A typical mess kit includes a twelve-inch skillet (the handle of which can be adjusted to lock the entire assembly together for storage), a slightly smaller lid/bowl, a pot with lid, utensils and a small cup. It can be used for cooking and eating food in wilderness settings.
Bedroll Metal Age ¤8.00 7 128 Two† A set of cloth pads designed to serve as emergency bedding in wilderness areas; at least one pad is thicker than the rest and is meant to be placed directly on the ground with the others serving as blankets. Later era bedrolls come in a single "sleeping bag" unit that is usually thicker and thus able to keep the user warmer at night. It usually comes with a cloth bag that, if filled with relatively soft materials such as dirty laundry, can be used as a makeshift pillow.
Rope Stone Age ¤0.65 5 32 One† A length of fibers twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting objects; it has tensile strength but is too flexible to provide compressive strength (i.e., it can be used for pulling but not pushing). Materials for Rope vary from natural sources such as vines to advanced polymers designed to prevent rot and mildew damage, depending on the age of manufacture. Rope can be used for multiple purposes including tying off shelter-halves, climbing, animal wrangling, as a method of strangulation and so forth.
Mountaineering Kit Industrial Age ¤193.50 8 256 Two A hard metallic case containing tools designed to be used for ascent and descent in areas with an extreme grade greater than 45 degrees, such as sheer cliffs or mountains. A typical mountaineering kit may contain items such as multiple ropes, pulleys, carabiners, a helmet (First Class equivalent), pads, gloves, spikes, chocks, ascenders, cams, a hand-axe (First Class equivalent) and harnesses. The kit provides a +10 DC bonus to any Three-Dimensional Maneuvers Check made for the purposes of climbing an extreme grade.
Carabiner Industrial Age ¤0.65 0 1 One A metallic loop with a sprung or screwed gate. It can be used as a secure fastening point for a rope-and-pulley system. Carabiners can also be used to fasten objects to the exterior of a Utility Belt, allowing it to carry objects up to four times larger than the size of any pocket on the belt at the cost of a -1 Finesse DC modifier for every object carried in this manner.
Portable Generator Industrial Age ¤234.00 9 512 One Requires Flammable Gas Canister; uses one charge every three minutes while operational or one charge for every period required by any device hooked up to it. A large internal combustion reactor designed to provide power to electronic devices. It comes with a set of wheels and a carrying bar for transportation. It may be used to power any electronic device with an external port (i.e. any device that would otherwise require Batteries if it is at least 8 slots in size or larger; weapons and shields are included in this definition). Later age models are a fusion reactor design that use fuel slugs for a power source instead (adds ¤88.75 to the cost; EC 6, 64 slots, provides 30,000 charges).
Matches Metal Age ¤0.25 2 4 One A wooden stick approximately 4 centimeters in length with an enlarged tip that contains a chemical solution including red phosphorus. When struck on a surface, some of the white phosphorus is produced, which subsequently ignites from the heat of friction. The stick is coated with wax, which enables it to light even when wet. It can be used to start fires. The price listed is for four 1 slot, EC0 boxes containing 50 matches a piece.
Fire Jelly Can Starfaring Age ¤1.00 4 16 One A metallic can filled with a gelatinous, flammable material; it is 8 inches tall and burns at a temperature of 285 °C for a maximum of sixteen hours. Putting the lid back on snuffs out the flame; it can be re-lit as long as there is still fuel in the can. It may be used as a portable light and heat source but must be ignited using another flame source.
Hotplate Industrial Age ¤8.00 4 16 One Requires Flammable Gas Canister; uses one charge every minute while in operation. A small metal plate hooked up to a gas-powered heater with adjustable settings. When activated, the plate warms up enabling the controlled heating of any object placed on top of it. It may hold and warm up the contents of a pot or skillet with a diameter of up to 30 centimeters. The device can also be used in a pinch as a ready heat source.
Flashlight (Domestic) Industrial Age ¤0.65 3 8 One Requires Small Battery; uses one charge every two minutes while in operation. A hard plastic cylinder with a small, moderate wattage incandescent bulb on one end designed to provide directional illumination. It provides full light at a distance of up to ten meters or dim light up to sixty meters from the emitting end.
Flashlight (Terrain-Proof) Industrial Age ¤27.40 4 16 One Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge every three minutes while in operation. A metallic cylinder with several small light-emitting diodes on one end designed to provide directional illumination. It requires twice as much damage to sunder as a normal object. It provides full light at a distance of up to twenty meters or dim light up to 120 meters from the emitting end.
Flashlight (Emergency) Industrial Age ¤3.25 3 8 One A metallic, rounded trapezoidal prism with three light-emitting diodes on one end designed to provide directional illumination. It comes with a hard plastic hand crank; turning the crank rapidly for one minute produces enough power to operate the device for up to one hour. It provides full light at a distance of up to ten meters or dim light up to sixty meters from the emitting end.
Compass Metal Age ¤3.25 2 4 One A magnetized needle designed to float freely either inside or on top of a liquid medium. If the planet on which the device is utilized has a magnetic field, its needle will be able to serve as a constant pointer towards the planet's magnetic poles; the planet must have a magnetic field for the device to function. Later age compasses may come with sights, magnified readouts, inclinometers and the ability to adjust for declination (adds ¤14.50 to the cost). It provides a +10 DC bonus to any Navigation Check made while planetside.
Canteen Metal Age ¤2.00 5 32 One A one-liter metal bottle with a cloth exterior cover. It has a twist on/off lid to keep its contents from spilling. It has no insulation, so over time its contents will heat up or cool down to the ambient temperature. It comes with a belt; the bottle hooks to the belt for storage.
Hip Flask Metal Age ¤6.50 1 2 One A six-fluid ounce engraved metallic bottle designed to contain a small amount of liquid. It has a twist on/off lid to keep its contents from spilling. It has no insulation, so over time its contents will heat up or cool down to the ambient temperature. The bottle is curved to match the contours of the humanoid hip, which allows it to be concealed and carried discreetly.
Survival Kit Industrial Age ¤484.00† 9 512 One† A 22-liter hard plastic cylinder containing supplies and equipment designed to be used in the event of an emergency. Typical contents include ten Protein Rations, five Fire Jelly Cans, a box of Purification Tablets, an Emergency Flashlight, Matches, a roll of Duct Tape, a Tarp, Plastic Sacks, Pencils, Paper, a Rope, a Compass, a Multi-Tool and a First Aid Kit. The price listed is for a kit designed to support up to ten people for a period of up to one week under emergency conditions. Larger kits may include a Distress Beacon and extra Batteries (adjust the price accordingly to include such goods).
Backpack Tent Metal Age ¤25.00 9 512 Four† A kit containing materials designed to provide a temporary A-frame shelter for up to two persons in field conditions. A typical tent usually consists of two poles, a large cloth cover or tarp, ropes and ground stakes. Later era tents will come with two more tarps (one to function as a ground cloth and one to function as a rain fly); these are usually made of more durable materials. It usually comes with a large bag with a shoulder strap for storage and transport and requires two people to set it up in ten minutes under normal ambient conditions.
Crew Tent Metal Age ¤53.25 10 1024 Six† A kit containing materials designed to provide a large, multiple-room temporary shelter in field conditions. This kind of tent typically consists of multiple poles, a very large cloth cover or tarp, ropes and ground stakes. Internal assemblies allow portions of the interior to be cordoned off with additional Tarps, creating "rooms". Later era tents will come with a ground cloth and rain fly and are usually made of more durable materials. It usually comes with a large bag with a wheeled frame assembly for storage and transport and requires three people to set it up in thirty minutes under normal ambient conditions. It provides shelter for up to twelve people.
Tarp Metal Age ¤3.25 5 32† Two A large sheet of reinforced soft, waterproof plastic designed to fold up to a relatively small size for transport. The edges include several metal grommets designed to allow ropes or poles to be attached at various points along the perimeter. It can be used to cover objects that need protection from the elements. In a pinch, a tarp can be used along with rope and poles as a shelter-half, thus providing limited shelter.
Hoverpack Starfaring Age ¤32,260.00 6 64 Two Requires Back Mount. Requires Large Battery; uses one charge every minute while in operation. A pack equipped with a miniaturized repulsor sled unit. When activated, it allows its user to hover in the air at altitudes up to five thousand meters and travel at a rate of up to nine hundred kph. Control is handled by two joysticks attached to the device. It comes with a modified Environmental Field Generator to maintain oxygen and to prevent ill effects from traveling at high speed, though for safety a Pressure Suit is still recommended when the device is in use. An emergency parachute is included with the unit in the event of sudden power loss.
Environmental Field Generator Starfaring Age ¤1,935.50 10 1024 One Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute while in operation. A large projector apparatus designed to produce a unified field barrier, which is used to cordon off an area of a planet's surface. The device can modify ambient conditions in this area to suit atmospheric and gravitational requirements of anyone located inside the field, making it useful for setting up campsites in otherwise inhospitable environments. It can cover a hemispherical area up to fifty meters in radius from the projector. It is as effective as a First Class vehicle Shield and auto-recharges when damaged. It also has a dual battery bus; the unit can run on one battery while the other is being replaced.
Wallet Metal Age ¤5.00 1 2 One Container; 10x1. A tough cloth pouch designed to hold very small objects such as coins. Later age models are designed to hold paper money and/or Debit Chits. It may also be used for holding paper notes and receipts. It can hook onto or fit inside any normal pocket.
Debit Chit Industrial Age ¤0.00† 0 1 One A small, flat piece of plastic encoded with a magnetic stripe that is designed to be quickly scanned by a reader. The reader will read off the information encoded on the stripe and use it to access a remote bank account, allowing the card's carrier to pay for transactions without having any actual cash on their person. For it to work, the user must be within transmission range of their bank. Some models also require a passkey, thumbprint, retinal scan and/or blood sample in order to activate it. Debit Chits are usually issued through the user's bank.
Chronometer Industrial Age ¤1.00 0 1 None† Requires Small Battery; uses one charge every five days. A small, hard plastic casing containing a microprocessor, a small quartz crystal, a lithium-ion battery and liquid crystal display. It is designed to keep track of the passage of time and constantly display that information to its user. In addition to showing the time, small push buttons allow the user to set alarms and to allow it to act as a stopwatch. It straps to a wrist (Motor Appendage) for transport.
Deluxe Chronometer Industrial Age ¤25.80 0 1 None† Requires Small Battery; uses one charge every four days. A small, metallic casing containing a microprocessor, a small quartz crystal, a lithium-ion battery and liquid crystal display. It is designed to keep track of the passage of time and constantly display that information to its user. In addition to having the features of a normal Chronometer, it can act as a calculator, radio receiver and voice memo recorder. It straps to a wrist (Motor Appendage) for transport.
Multi-Tool Industrial Age ¤21.00† 1 2 One† A generalized instrument consisting of several small metallic tools designed to fold down into a metallic case encased in hard plastic. Each included tool locks down into position individually when they are in use. The tools included vary from model to model. The price listed is for a model that contains two Blades (First Class), pliers, two types of screwdrivers, a file, a bottle opener, a small ruler, tweezers, wire cutters, scissors, a toothpick and a hole punch.
Textbook Metal Age ¤21.50 5 32 Two A thick stack of Paper glued to a piece of cloth, attached to two pieces of thick cardboard and glued in place with additional paper. This kind of book typically includes material on a single topic matter and is used in academic settings, though not all books of this type are academic in nature. The accuracy of the information contained in the book may vary depending on the topic, the author's knowledge of the topic and its date of publication. It can be used to increase the result of a user's Knowledge Check on a given subject.

Comestibles

Comestibles consist of items that provide biochemical energy when ingested or assist in its generation. For most races, any comestible is a single-use item (and we really don't want to think about those races that eat their food more than once). Characters must eat; if they don't, it can have serious physiological consequences (see Chapter 12.3). A comestible item often has to be carried in some kind of container until it is ready to be consumed; the "Size" stat below reflects the size of the container, not necessarily the food itself. Comestibles generally require only one Motor Appendage to consume and two to get the container open. Comestibles otherwise use the basic stats.

Comestibles
Name Availability Cost EC Size Description
Food (Luxury) Metal Age ¤10.65 Varies† Varies† The good stuff; this can be anything from caviar to filet mignon as long as it represents food that is very rare or very "choice" (and therefore very expensive). It's unusual to find this kind of food anywhere in a spaceship's larders. The cost listed is per "unit" of food (i.e. enough food for one person for one meal or a single course of one meal in particularly exorbitant cases).
Food (Fresh) Stone Age ¤43.00 Varies† Varies† This refers to any food that goes in a straight line from its source to a plate; usually this is local fruits and vegetables but occasionally will include various meats. Fresh food is a high luxury to most starfaring crews; it's rare to find a crew well-off enough to keep a steady supply of fresh food for every meal, particularly with a war going on. The cost listed provides enough food to feed one CSC 5 sapient for approximately one week, assuming the food itself will stay fresh for that long.
Food (Canned) Industrial Age ¤26.75 Varies† Varies† As the name suggests, canned food has been processed for prolonged storage in some form of tin or metallic can. Storage in cans tends to deprive the food of some of its flavor and nutritional value; on the other hand, cans are extremely easy to store and transport. Pull-tabs are used to open the can and access the food. Once the food inside is consumed, the can itself can be used for various purposes. The vast majority of starfaring crews carry canned food for the bulk of their meals. The cost listed provided enough food to feed one CSC 5 sapient for approximately one week. Cans generally keep the food fresh enough for consumption for several months or sometimes years.
Meal, Ready to Eat (MRE) Rations Industrial Age ¤16.75 10 1024 Three lies for the price of one - it's not a meal, it's not ready and you can't eat it. A box of twelve standard military rations. Each ration comes with a high-energy course, a high-carb course, drink mix and pouch, accessory pouch (includes utensils and necessary materials) and a flameless heater. Each ration has a shelf life of up to ten years if kept in dry storage. The heater unit can be used to jury-rig an improvised explosive device (Requires a successful Resourcefulness Check; First Class Satchel Charge equivalent).
Protein Ration Starfaring Age ¤13.55 5 32 Protein Rations are about as basic as it gets but in a pinch they provide a reliable source of emergency food. Each ration tube is filled with a nearly tasteless paste high in protein content, which can provide enough energy to sustain a person until better food can be found. Dirt-poor starfaring crews can subsist on this stuff, though the lack of taste is liable to put a serious dent in their morale. The cost listed is for a single tube, which (if doled out in proper servings) contains enough paste to feed a CSC 5 sapient for one week. Protein Rations are designed as a permanent staple; they will be as nutritious a hundred years from their date of manufacture as they are when they are first packaged - they will also likely be just as "tasty".
Chewing Gum Stone Age ¤0.25 0 1 A package of seventeen individually wrapped slices of sweetened and flavored hardened tree sap; each slice is mildly adhesive once chewed. Gum appeases hunger and staves off the need for sleep for approximately one hour. It may be used for a variety of other purposes.
Beer Stone Age ¤1.50 4 16 An alcoholic beverage distilled from the fermentation of sugars derived from starch-based material. The price listed is for one .59 liter (20 fluid ounce) stein. Beer may require more than one Motor Appendage in order to consume depending on how much of it the drinker has already consumed. Beer reduces the amount of time the drinker can go without water by one hour and causes Intoxication (see Chapter 12.3).
Wine Stone Age ¤34.50 9 512 An alcoholic beverage distilled from the fermentation of fruits. The price listed is for a case of twelve magnums (1.5 liters each; 18 liters total) of medium-quality wine. Wine can require more than one Motor Appendage in order to consume depending on how much of it the drinker has already consumed. Wine reduces the amount of time the drinker can go without water by half an hour and causes Intoxication (see Chapter 12.3).
Whiskey Metal Age ¤30.00 6 64 A strong alcoholic beverage distilled from fermented grain mash and aged in a wooden cask. The price listed is for three 0.75 liter decanters of high concentration drink (approximately 80 proof). This drink usually requires more than one Motor Appendage in order to consume depending on whether or not the drinker has already consumed at least one drink. Whiskey reduces the amount of time the drinker can go without water by two hours and causes Intoxication (see Chapter 12.3). If the particular brew is higher than 80 proof, there is a chance that the drink will cause blindness (requires a Fortitude Save to avert and additional Fortitude Saves for each additional drink).
Soda Metal Age ¤0.25 6 64 A non-alcoholic beverage made from a combination of carbonated water and various syrups. The price listed is for one two-liter (67.6 fluid ounce) plastic bottle of soda. Soda reduces the amount of time the drinker can go without water by one hour. Drinking the entire bottle at once inflicts a -1 DC penalty to all Finesse Checks for the next eight hours.
Purification Tablets Industrial Age ¤2.25 2 4 A box of thirty 600 milligram chlorine dioxide tablets impregnated with a flocculating agent. Each tablet can purify up to a liter of water at 25°C with multiple tablets required at lower temperatures. The agent takes approximately thirty minutes to purify the water and make it safe for consumption (it removes any biological and chemical contaminants present).

Scanners and Computer Technologies

A scanner is any device used to electronically gather information about a character's surroundings. Computer technologies include any type of machine that manipulates data according to a given list of instructions known as a program as well as the programs themselves and any corresponding documentation. The presence of scanners and computer technologies in a society generally doesn't come about until their Industrial Age, though there are a few primitive societies that have simple counting machines that can be considered computers. For the sake of simplicity, GMs should assume these technologies are available in Industrial Age societies; Starfaring Age tech will be so noted. Some of the items indicated are software, while others are computers. Software requires a computer in order to work; the type of computer needed can be determined by the GM. Scanners and computer technologies otherwise use the basic stats.

Scanners and Computer Technologies
Name Cost EC Size Appendages Description
Environmental Scanner ¤645.00 4 16 One Starfaring Age, Computer. Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute of operation. A small, compact scanning device primarily designed for geophysical, biological, archaeological, anthropological and meteorological applications. It can be adapted to function as any other kind of computer or scanning device with the proper add-ons and software. Use of the scanner grants a +25 DC bonus to all Science Checks while on a planetary surface or a +10 DC bonus to all Science Checks in any other situation.
Science Kit ¤48.40 8 256 One† A metallic case containing beakers and flasks of various sizes, vials of litmus paper, vials of acid, Petri dishes, forceps and various tools designed to perform multiple scientific tasks. It adds a +10 DC bonus to any Science Check when used, with the bonus decreasing by 1 per additional use unless refilled. Starfaring Age science kits will also include an Environmental Scanner (adds ¤650 to the cost).
Gun Scanner ¤580.70 1 2 None Starfaring Age. Requires Small Battery; uses one charge per day and one charge to initially activate its alarm system. A palm-sized device designed to scan exclusively for any kind of ranged weapon within a certain radius (usually 200 meters) and to alert its user of a weapon's presence if one is detected. A display on the device indicates the azimuth, elevation and range to the weapon detected. It can be set for audible alarm, to vibrate silently and/or to transmit a remote alert message. A network of these scanners can be set up independently to provide zone security for a given area, though given its high per unit price it is far more common to see them used as individual units.
Motion Detector ¤112.90 1 2 None† Requires Small Battery; uses one charge every two days and one charge to initially activate its alarm system. A small device that contains passive infrared sensors as well as microwave emitters designed to alert its user if motion is detected within its sensor's field of view. A display on the device indicates azimuth, elevation and range to the motion detected. It can be set for audible alarm, to vibrate silently (for handheld models) and/or to transmit a remote alert message. A network of these scanners can be set up to provide zone security for a given area.
Hand-held Global Navigation/Triangulation System ¤41.95 2 4 One Requires Small Battery; uses one charge per minute while in operation. A hand-held, battery operated device designed to assist in planetary navigation and location. The device receives a signal from orbiting geosynchronous satellites and uses the information received to triangulate its own position on a planetary surface. Starfaring Age sets will work without an orbiting satellite network provided that a communication link with a planetary transmitter is available; a parked capital ship counts. Using the device provides a +25 DC bonus to any Orientation Check made by its operator provided it is in good working order.
PDA ¤65.00 2 4 One Computer. Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge per minute while in operation; it can be plugged into a power socket for extended-term use. A small, limited utility handheld computer. Comes with day-planner, personal directory, scientific calculator and memo-taking software; it usually comes with a few games as well. It can carry up to five pieces of installed software.
Tablet Computer ¤129.05† 4 16 Two Computer. Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational; it can be plugged into a power socket for extended-term use. A medium-sized, mixed-utility handheld computer designed to combine the portability of a PDA with the functionality of a more traditional laptop computer. It comes with a 25 centimeter high-resolution, fingerprint-resistant touchscreen and can be equipped with several internal features including video and audio recording capabilities, global positioning features, on-board accelerometers and gyroscope stabilization. It comes with a day-planner, personal directory, scientific calculator and memo-taking software as well as music and navigational software; it usually comes with a few games as well. Some models are equipped with a stylus for writing utilities. It can carry up to fifteen pieces of installed software; some models may carry more software with a proportional increase in the price.
Laptop Computer ¤435.50 6 64 Two Computer. Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational; it can be plugged into a power socket for extended-term use. A large, portable computer, designed with many of the same features as a desktop or integrated terminal with the hardware miniaturized and optimized for mobility and efficient power consumption. It usually comes with at least one port for Memory Sticks and/or Data Crystals. It may have several programs installed as part of the on-board operating system; it can carry up to 25 pieces of additional installed software.
Wafer Laptop ¤12,750.00 0 1 One† Starfaring Age, Computer. Requires Small Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational; it can be plugged into a power socket for extended-term use. A portable computer the size of a debit chit designed with many of the same features as a full-sized laptop or integrated terminal. It uses extreme hardware miniaturization including wireless data ports and virtualization where needed, optimized for mobility and efficient power consumption. It usually comes with five wireless digital ports for data crystals, a virtual 10x minidisk with adapter, wave.net frequency adapter and installed software. It may have several programs installed as part of the on-board operating system; it can carry up to 25 pieces of additional installed software. It may be carried in a standard Wallet when not in use.
Memory Stick ¤16.15† 0 1 One A thin device roughly the size of a Terran forefinger with a dongle designed to interface with a computer's input port. It can be used to store computer files and small pieces of software independently of a computer. The memory capacity for the price listed is approximately four gigabytes; higher capacity sticks typically cost more and vice versa.
Data Crystal ¤1.60† 1 2 One Starfaring Age. A carborundum crystal employed as a form of optical, non-volatile data storage. The hardness of the crystal makes it particularly difficult to leave surface scratches, leading to a minimal amount of data corruption over an extended period of time even under conditions of extreme mechanical and thermal stress. Its overall storage capacity is dependent upon the physical size of the crystal itself. It can be used to store computer files and small pieces of software independently of a computer. The memory capacity for the price listed is approximately four gigabytes, which is typically the lowest capacity available. Higher capacity crystals typically cost substantially more.
Software Development Suite ¤290.35 0† 0† None† Software. A set of inter-related programs and libraries designed to allow a user to develop their own computer programs. This kind of development suite has been thoroughly assembled, tested and debugged by a dedicated software development company and is typically released to the consumer at great expense. The suite utilizes the programming language of the user's choice. It typically includes an IDE interface as well as a compiler or interpreter depending on the needs of the particular programming language, and a debugger. Writing software is a complicated process that takes a lot of time and effort to accomplish; it takes at least one full day of concentrated effort to write and begin debugging a program, which requires three successful Resourcefulness Checks in a row; the circumstances of the Checks are dependent upon the amount of time the developer wants to spend on the program and its final level of complexity).
Freeware Development Suite ¤0.00 0† 0† None† Software. A set of inter-related programs and libraries designed to allow a user to develop their own computer programs. This kind of development suite has been put together by a single programmer or independent programming group and is typically released to the consumer at no expense. The suite utilizes the programming language of the user's choice. It may or may not include an IDE interface and/or a debugger but always comes with a compiler or interpreter, depending on the needs of the specific programming language. Writing software is a complicated process that takes a lot of time and effort to accomplish; it takes at least one full day of concentrated effort to write and begin debugging a program, which requires three successful Resourcefulness Checks in a row; the circumstances of the Checks dependent upon the amount of time the developer wants to spend on the program and its final level of complexity).
Anti-Virus Software ¤25.80† 0† 0† None† Software. A set of inter-related programs designed to minimize a computer's susceptibility to malicious software. It typically includes a real-time malware protection system, real-time scanner and firewall program. It can protect a computer system from any form of malicious software, provided the attacking software is included in the protection system's set of malware definitions. There's a ¤13.00 annual fee to renew the usage of the software if it is privately owned. It inflicts a DC penalty on any Check made to hack the computer upon which the software is installed, the degree of which is left to the discretion of the GM based on the sophistication of both the malware and anti-virus software.
Office Application Software ¤96.80 0† 0† None† Software. A set of inter-related programs typically designed to be used by scholars and clerical workers usually designed with similar interfaces amongst the various programs of the software suite. Typically includes a full word processor, spreadsheet program, personal information manager and presentation program; it can be expanded with additional programs such as a database management or dedicated desktop publishing program). It enables a character to perform basic office tasks using a computer; the game effects are left to the discretion of the GM.
Library Computer Software ¤395.20 0† 0† None† Starfaring Age, Software. A set of inter-related programs and data files designed to be used by researchers and academics, usually with similar interfaces amongst the various programs of the software suite. It typically includes many different types of data files as well as software for reading those files and searching for particular subjects or key phrases within them. It can be expanded with cataloging software to control a particular library collection. It enables a character to perform research using a computer, which gives a +20 DC bonus to any Knowledge Check made while using the software. Other effects are possible at the GM's discretion.

Communication Technologies

Communication Technologies include any type of mechanical device designed to facilitate the transmission and/or reception of a message (usually audio, video or text) over a significant distance. Mechanical forms of broadcasting usually come about during a society's Industrial Age, although primitive societies that have regular contact with more advanced species will tend to employ advanced communication technologies (particularly translators). The communication technologies listed herein are available in Industrial Age societies unless otherwise noted. Also, it is assumed that societies employing these technologies have developed them to the point where they are relatively light and compact and can therefore be operated with a single Motor Appendage unless otherwise noted. Communication technologies otherwise use the basic stats.

Communication Technologies
Name Cost EC Size Description
Short Range Communicator ¤25.00 2 4 Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge per hour in standby mode and one charge every two minutes while operational. A small, multi-channel low-powered voice transmitter and receiver assembly encased in hard plastic; when activated, it enables long-range voice communication. Because most of the device's internal power goes to encryption, its range is limited though it is substantially harder for outside parties to intercept and listen in on any transmissions to or from it (subtract 25 from the DC of any such attempt). It enables any planetbound character to "hail" any ship or character on the same planet's surface set up to receive the transmission. Industrial Age sets must be no more than ten kilometers away from a suitable broadcast tower; Starfaring Age sets add ¤100 to the price and can broadcast up to a range of 150 kilometers without access to towers.
Long Range Communicator ¤48.40 3 8 Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per hour in standby mode or one charge every two minutes while operational. A medium-sized, multi-channel high-powered voice transmitter and receiver assembly encased in hard plastic; when activated, it enables long-range voice communication. Because most of the device's internal power goes into transmission, it has a longer range than encrypted transmitters (up to 500 kilometers). However, all messages sent from it will be "in the clear"; anyone tuned in to the same frequency will receive the transmission whether they are meant to or not. It enables any planetbound character to "hail" any ship or character on the same planet's surface set up to receive the transmission. Starfaring Age sets add ¤100 to the price and have the same level of encryption as a short-range set.
Ship-Linked Communicator ¤80.65 3 8 Starfaring Age. Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per hour in standby mode or one charge every two minutes while operational. A medium-sized, multi-channel high-powered voice transmitter and receiver assembly encased in a hard plastic; when activated, it enables long-range voice communication. Ship-linked communicators are set to a specific frequency and may not be re-tuned in the field without cracking them open and resetting them by hand (which requires two successful Damage Control Checks in a row). The selected frequency is monitored by the device's parent craft, enabling a character equipped with the device instant communication with it. Ship-linked communicators use heavy encryption and are guaranteed to be able to contact their parent craft regardless of its position as long as it is within 500 kilometers.
Translator ¤32.25 2 4 Starfaring Age. Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge per hour in standby mode or one charge every two minutes while operational. A modified short-range communicator designed to analyze an incoming message through its receiver, wash it through a sophisticated translation matrix and output a translated message through an auditory monitor (which takes the place of the device's signal transmitter). The device is capable of delivering a message with almost 100% accuracy even if the source and/or target language is not within its pre-programmed database. When employed, the device grants a +25 DC bonus to all Translate Checks.
Handsfree ¤12.90 0 1 Requires No Appendages; inserts into Auditory Organ. Requires Small Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational. A small transceiver assembly designed to be worn in the ear containing a miniaturized microphone and speaker assembly. The device is designed to make a wireless connection to any dedicated Communicator (Short-Range, Long-Range or Ship-Linked Communicator). It enables the user to use their Communicator without having to have it in hand. Any frequency re-tuning required will have to be done through the parent Communicator.
Concealed Emergency Signal Device ¤484.00 0 1 Starfaring Age. A gold-alloy ring with a carborundum or diamond stone setting. The interior of the ring incorporates a miniaturized personal location beacon with a range of approximately fifty kilometers; turning the stone to a pre-set position activates it, covertly sending out a distress signal to any local authorities. The extreme miniaturization of the technology combined with the value of the materials involved make this device particularly expensive. It is also available in the form of a bracelet, brooch or pendant.
Distress Beacon ¤161.30 5 32 Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational. A large box containing an ultra-high power transmitter pre-set to a specific emergency frequency band. Upon activation, the device transmits a brief repeating signal on the pre-selected frequency; this signal will repeat until deactivated or until the device runs out of power. Starfaring Age sets will allow the user to record their own custom distress message and will contain a GPS navigation system, allowing the device to transmit its own location along with the emergency signal. Its maximum broadcast range is 50,000 kilometers in clear weather with markedly worse performance in poorer conditions. It enables a planetbound character to perform Distress Checks in order to send a long-range distress call.
Signal Jammer ¤72.60 5 32 Requires Two Motor Appendages. Requires Large Battery; gulps down one charge every ten seconds while operational. A large box containing an ultra-high power transmitter. It is designed to be tuned into a limited set of frequencies and to send out a dead-air transmission along them; this overpowers any other transmission without necessarily revealing any overt jamming to the intended receiver (who receives nothing; not even static). Given the large amount of power typically required to jam a transmission, its Batteries tend not to last very long. Typically, these devices are equipped with a dual "bus" so that one Battery can be switched out while the device operates on the other. Its range is typically 500 kilometers; it enables a planetbound character to perform Distress Checks in order to jam any desired transmission source within that range.

Medicine and Medical Technologies

Medicine includes any item used for the prevention and/or treatment of a variety of ailments. Medical Technologies include any kind of device or tool designed to be used for the purpose of diagnosing medical problems. These items in aggregate include everything from simple bandages, inoculations for particular diseases, items designed to repair serious injuries and so forth. For the sake of simplicity, all objects in this category are available in Industrial Age societies unless otherwise noted. Medicine and Medical Technologies otherwise use the basic stats.

Medicine and Medical Technologies
Name Cost EC Size Appendages Description
Medical Kit ¤1,290.00 8 256 One† Starfaring Age. A large metallic briefcase containing various medical tools and supplies, including a Bio-Scanner, hypodermic autoinjectors containing various medicines (up to 20 individual doses), three IV Sacks, a Cellular Regenerator and other various pieces of sundry medical equipment. The kit allows a character to perform any medical procedure in the field short of major surgery or putting someone in stasis (it adds 20 to the DC of any Treatment Check made outside of a hospital setting).
First-Aid Kit ¤195.00 7 128 One† A basic but extensive emergency medical care kit containing various basic medical supplies including bandages of various sizes (10 normal Bandages), anti-septic wipes (10 Medicated Bandages), an IV Sack, a vial of Anti-Toxin and Painkillers (3 autoinjectors). The kit allows any person to perform basic life-saving procedures in the field; it adds 15 to the DC of any Intensive Care Check.
Burn Kit ¤19.25 6 64 One† A specialized emergency care kit designed for the treatment of burns. Its contents include two Bandages, one Medicated Bandage, one Painkiller autoinjector and one Antibiotics autoinjector. It also includes a small, vacuum-sealed vial of distilled water and another of polyethylene glycol to be used for the treatment of chemical burns; in a pinch, the water vial can be used to put out or flush away any chemical burn agent still in contact with the patient. It allows a medic to treat any secondary Wound caused via a Burn or to prevent infection in the initial Wound; a Burn Kit is required for such treatment.
Vita Kit ¤32.25 5 32 One A rudimentary first-aid kit designed for use by non-medical personnel to be used in the event of an emergency well away from any source of medical care or while traveling solo. The kit contains a Painkiller autoinjector, a Stimulant autoinjector and a Bandage. Some kits also include a Protein Ration tube, which may be used in the event that the user also is in need of a ready source of nutrients (adds ¤13.00 to the cost). While a user can't expect a lot of medical care in a real emergency from one of these, they're better than nothing; its use removes any unfavorable circumstances from an Intensive Care Check made outside of a hospital setting.
Bio-Scanner ¤580.75 4 16 One Starfaring Age. Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational. A specialized type of Environmental Scanner that has been modified for dedicated biological and medical applications. It usually comes with a probe the size of a Terran palm; this probe is used for detailed scans at close range. The scanner grants a +5 DC bonus to all Medicine Checks when used prior to any treatment.
Bandage ¤3.25 4 16 Two Metal Age. A rolled-up strip of sterile cloth or gauze used to cover any open wounds in order to keep any dirt and pathogens out and to aid in clotting. It can be cut into smaller strips as needed. Industrial Age bandages come in a box with roughly 30 pre-cut strips, each with adhesive ends; these are generally designed for smaller wounds. It can be applied to a wounded character to prevent any additional HP loss from Wounds.
Medicated Bandage ¤3.75 4 16 Two A standard Bandage that has been impregnated with a form of liquid antibiotic. Usually this kind of Bandage is already pre-cut into smaller strips but large versions do exist. The shelf-life of a medicated bandage is approximately three months, after which the antibiotic goes inert; the bandage simply functions as a normal Bandage after that point. It can be applied to a wounded character in order to prevent additional HP loss from Wounds and will keep those Wounds from becoming infected if they aren't already so.
Cellular Regenerator ¤484.00 2 4 One Starfaring Age. Requires Medium Battery; uses one charge every thirty seconds while operational. A hand-held device designed to scan a lifeform for physical damage. It produces a field that re-bonds damaged cells and tissues, allowing quick healing with minimal scarring even in the worst cases. It is useful for healing anything from light cuts and scrapes all the way to deep tissue damage. The process does take some time to take hold, so it is impractical to perform any form of major surgery (such as re-attaching a severed limb) without administering additional forms of medication and treatment. When used, the device adds a +25 DC bonus to any Treatment Check made to heal a Wound and allows an extra Wound to be healed per healing attempt.
Anti-Toxin ¤113.00 1 2 One An autoinjector containing a dose of antitoxin. Industrial Age injectors will be for very specific types of toxins (antivenins for snakebites, etc.); Starfaring Age injectors may be used to counter any toxin. Starfaring Age injectors also incorporate a small stasis unit inside the autoinjector, which extends the medicine's shelf life; add ¤16.25 to the cost of Starfaring Age doses. When injected with Anti-Toxin, a patient must attempt to two Fortitude Saves in a row; if both are successful, the medicine will not work. When successfully used on a patient, it grants a +25 DC bonus to any Specialized Medicine Check made in an attempt to counter any poison previously given to them.
Stimulant ¤16.25 1 2 One An autoinjector containing two doses of general stimulant (epinephrine is a Terran example). It can be used to temporarily revive an unconscious character (see Chapter 9.2) or to provide a temporary boost in order to stave off the need for sleep (it temporarily removes fatigue but not sleep debt). It is also effective against anaphylaxis; it reduces the effect of allergens if the character has a significant Allergic Complication unless the character's allergy is to the stimulants themselves. Stimulants are mildly addictive; a character must make a Willpower Save in order to avoid taking an additional point towards an Addicted Complication (Stimulants). When injected with Stimulants, a patient must make two Fortitude Saves in a row; if successful, the medicine will not work.
Antibiotics ¤3.25 1 2 One An autoinjector containing one dose of general broad-spectrum medicine designed to promote anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and/or anti-parasitic activity within the body (penicillin is a Terran example). It can be used to fight existing infections within wounds (the shot removes an infection on a successful Specialized Medicine Check) or to prevent an infection from occurring (which requires a successful Treatment Check). When injected with Antibiotics, a patient must make three successful Fortitude Saves in a row; if successful, the medicine will not work.
Painkillers ¤4.75 1 2 One An autoinjector containing one dose of a general analgesic (morphine is a Terran example). It can be used to temporarily cancel any penalties to a character's Checks from having Wounds. When injected with Painkillers, a patient must make two successful Fortitude Saves in a row; if successful, the medicine will not work. Painkillers are generally effective for a period of eight hours per dose. Note that painkillers do not prevent HP loss from Wounds. Painkillers are highly addictive; a character must make two successful Willpower Saves in a row in order to avoid taking an additional two points towards an Addicted Complication (Painkillers).
Tranquilizer ¤8.00 1 2 One An autoinjector containing one dose of a general anesthetic/analgesic medicine (ketamine is a Terran example). It can be used to render a patient unconscious, a necessary step before beginning emergency surgery or any other activity wherein the patient would be exposed to excruciating pain (if limiting pain is a consideration). When injected with Tranquilizers, a patient must make two successful Fortitude Saves in a row; if successful, the medicine will not work. Tranquilizers induce immediate stasis (the patient becomes Unconscious with 0 NHP) if successfully administered. Tranquilizers are moderately addictive (character must make a Willpower Save to avoid taking an additional point towards an Addicted Complication (Tranquilizers)).
Intravenous Fluid (IV) Sack ¤2.00 5 32 Two* A sterilized, sealed plastic bag containing one liter of a solution of water, 5% dextrose and 0.45% sodium chloride. It allows a patient that is either starving or dehydrated to begin recovering if they are Unconscious and can be used to give injections to patients who for whatever reason cannot receive them directly (such as a patient who has been badly burned). It requires a successful Treatment Check in order to administer properly; it inflicts one point of Lethal Damage on a successful Check and 1d10 points of Lethal Damage on a failed Check. Once in place, the patient may use a portable hangar to keep the bag in position to deliver medicine or simply hold it over their head.
Portable Stasis Unit ¤806.50 10 1024 Two Starfaring Age. Requires Large Battery and a Cryogenic Gas Canister; uses one charge of both battery power and cryogenic gas every thirty seconds while operational; if it is required to operate on only a single Battery, the rate of both power and gas consumption doubles. A metal and canvas stretcher large enough to carry a CSC 5 creature, which incorporates a miniaturized, focused Environmental Field Generator as well as a miniaturized Repulsor Sled. The field has been modified such that it can maintain a cryogenic environment inside the field no matter what ambient conditions exist. A triple battery bus allows the freezer unit to maintain operation on two Batteries while the third is being replaced; similar fixtures are available for Cryogenic Gas Canisters. The repulsor allows a single operator to move the unit around even while the device is in operation. It allows a character to place a patient into stasis temporarily while awaiting transport to a more dedicated stasis unit.

Weapon Accessories, Ammunition and Batteries

Ammunition is any object required by a weapon in order for it to function as intended, such as metal slugs (bullets), kinetic darts with sabot jackets (generally just called sabots) and arrows. A Battery is an object required by another device in order to provide enough electrical power for it to function as intended. Devices that require Batteries include certain tools, personal energy shield generators and some weapons (the reason why they are included in this section). The amount of remaining electrical power that an individual battery can provide to a device is measured in charges; once depleted of charges and/or the ability to recharge, a battery is worthless. Finally, weapon accessories are objects designed to attach to a weapon in order to improve upon or maintain its performance or usability; laser designators and sights are included in this definition. Unless otherwise noted, it's assumed that Ammunition, Batteries and Accessories are directly utilized by the weapons/devices that require them; they do not require direct manipulation by a character's Motor Appendages. This is not the case when the need arrives to reload the weapon in which these objects are being used; it's generally assumed that two Motor Appendages are required to reload a weapon in all cases. They otherwise use the basic stats.

Weapon Accessories, Ammunition and Batteries
Name Availability Cost EC Size Description
Metal Age Bullets Metal Age ¤0.25 1 2 A leather pouch containing up to twenty lead balls along with wadding and black powder. It provides ammunition for any Metal Age Slugthrower.
Industrial/Starfaring Bullets Industrial Age ¤8.00† 3 8 A cardboard box containing 100 cartridges; add ¤1.50 to the cost for each Slugthrower Class above First Class for which the cartridges are meant to provide ammunition. If the weapon itself has a cost modifier, multiply the ammo cost by that modifier. It provides ammunition for a Slugthrower provided it is used with the corresponding weapon Class.
Bullet Clip Industrial Age ¤8.00 2 4 A spring-loaded device designed to hold and load slugs into a Slugthrower. It can hold a full magazine's worth of bullets for a given firearm; it reduces the reloading time of a given Slugthrower to a single round provided it's loaded with ammo that corresponds to the weapon's Class.
Bullet Belt Industrial Age ¤40.25† 5 32 Requires One Appendage. A belt with one thousand cartridge rounds designed to substantially increase the size of the magazine of a Repeater Slugthrower. It cannot be used with other Slugthrower types. Add ¤3.25 to the cost for each Slugthrower Class above First Class for which the cartridges are designed to provide ammunition. It provides ammunition for a Repeater Slugthrower provided it is loaded with ammo that corresponds to the weapon's Class.
Tranquilizer Dart Sabot Industrial Age ¤129.00† 3 8 A cardboard box containing 100 darts; each dart contains an autoinjector system designed to deliver one dose of tranquilizer to its target and is encased in a metal sabot, which enables it to be fired from a normal Slugthrower. If the dart hits an unarmored portion of the target's body, it is injected with Tranquilizer (see above); otherwise the dart acts like a normal dart. Add ¤3.25 to the cost for each Slugthrower Class above First Class for which the darts are designed to provide ammunition; if the weapon itself has a cost modifier, multiply the ammo cost by that modifier. The dart itself does 0.25* the damage of a bullet of the same Class but it is never converted to Non-Lethal Damage by Armor. It provides ammunition for a Slugthrower provided it is used with the corresponding weapon Class.
Explosive Dart Sabot Starfaring Age ¤322.50† 4 16 Blast Weapon. A cardboard box containing 100 explosive squash-head darts; each dart is encased in a sabot, which enables it to be fired from a normal Slugthrower. Add ¤16.25 to the cost for each Class above First Class for which the darts are designed to provide ammunition; if the weapon itself has a cost modifier, multiply the ammo cost by that modifier. It causes 1.5 times the normal damage of a Slugthrower of the indicated Class; damage falls off at a rate of 20 points per range increment from the point of impact. Damage from this ammo type is never converted to Non-Lethal Damage by Armor. It provides ammunition for a Slugthrower provided it is used with the corresponding weapon Class.
Poison Dart Sabot Industrial Age ¤161.25† 3 8 A cardboard box containing 100 darts; each dart contains an autoinjector designed to deliver one dose of nerve agent to the target and is encased in a metal sabot, which enables it to be fired from a normal Slugthrower. If the dart hits an unarmored portion of the target's body, the target is injected with nerve agent (see Chapter 12.3); otherwise the dart acts like a normal dart. Add ¤8.00 to the cost for each Class above First Class for which the darts are designed to provide ammunition; if the weapon itself has a cost modifier, multiply the ammo cost by that modifier. The dart itself does 0.25* the damage of a bullet of the same Class but it is never converted to Non-Lethal Damage by Armor. It provides ammunition for a Slugthrower provided it is used with the corresponding weapon Class.
Sabot Belt Starfaring Age ¤64.50† 4 16 Requires One Appendage. A belt with one thousand flechettes, each encased in a large expanding cup sabot designed to enable firing from a Repeater Slugthrower. Add ¤1.50 to the cost for each Class above First Class for which the darts are designed to provide ammunition. The flechettes themselves do 0.25* the damage of a bullet of the same Class but it is never converted to Non-Lethal Damage by Armor. It provides ammunition for a Repeater Slugthrower provided it is used with the corresponding weapon Class.
Small Battery Industrial Age ¤6.50 0 1 A set of small electrochemical cells connected in series and encased in a metallic wrapper. It is useful for providing power to pieces of equipment via direct electrical current. This kind of Battery carries 100 charges. Some batteries can be recharged once discharged (add ¤1.50 to the price; recharging occurs at a rate of 5 charges per hour and removes five charges from the total maximum charge of the Battery). It can be used as an improvised explosive device if thrown into a fire (First Class Grenade equivalent).
Medium Battery Industrial Age ¤13.00 1 2 A set of medium-sized electrochemical cells connected in series and encased in a metallic wrapper. It is useful for providing power to pieces of equipment via direct electrical current. This kind of Battery carries 125 charges. Some batteries can be recharged once discharged (add ¤1.50 to the price; recharging occurs at a rate of 5 charges per hour and removes five charges from the total maximum charge of the Battery). It can be used as an improvised explosive device if thrown into a fire (Second Class Grenade equivalent).
Large Battery Industrial Age ¤19.35 2 4 A set of large electrochemical cells connected in series and encased in a metallic wrapper. It is useful for providing power to pieces of equipment via direct electrical current. This kind of Battery carries 150 charges. Some batteries can be recharged once discharged (add ¤1.50 to the price; recharging occurs at a rate of 5 charges per hour and removes five charges from the total maximum charge of the Battery). It can be used as an improvised explosive device if thrown into a fire (Third Class Grenade equivalent).
Quiver Stone Age ¤1.50 3 8 A wooden or leather bag designed to hold arrows. It comes with twenty arrows, each of which costs ¤0.25 to purchase separately. It provides ammunition to a Bow of any Class.
Flammable Gas Canister Metal Age ¤9.75† 7† 128† A metal canister containing a volume of aliphatic hydrocarbons in liquid form. It is usually accompanied by a second canister containing pressurized nitrogen gas, which is used to project the hydrocarbon mixture over a distance. Canisters come in three sizes: small (100 charges), medium (125 charges; EC8, 256 slots; adds ¤3.25 to the cost), and large (150 charges; EC9, 512 slots; adds ¤8.00 to the cost). It can be recharged at a dedicated station; the process takes 15 minutes. It can be used as an improvised explosive device if the interior of the canister is exposed to fire or heat (Fifth Class Grenade equivalent). It provides ammunition to a Flamethrower of any Class and can also provide fuel for certain devices.
Cryogenic Gas Canister Industrial Age ¤8.00† 7† 128† A metal canister containing a volume of liquid nitrogen. It is usually accompanied by a second canister containing pressurized helium gas, which is used to project the liquid nitrogen over a distance. Canisters come in three sizes: small (100 charges), medium (125 charges; EC8, 256 slots; adds ¤3.25 to the cost), and large (150 charges; EC9, 512 slots; adds ¤8.00 to the cost). It can be recharged at a dedicated station; the process takes 30 minutes. It can be used as an improvised explosive device if the canister is punctured (Fourth Class Grenade equivalent). It provides ammunition to a Cryo-Gas Dispenser of any Class and can also provide fuel for certain devices.
Missile Industrial Age Varies† 8 256 A miniaturized rocket assembly designed to be loaded into a shoulder-mounted launcher used for the purpose of remotely delivering an explosive charge to a given target. The price of the missile is 0.75* the total cost indicated for a weapon of a given Class (and option, if applicable). It provides ammunition to a Missile Launcher and allows it to be re-used after its initial ordnance has been fired.
Handcuffs (Zip-Tie) Industrial Age ¤3.25 2 4 A set of six ratcheted straps made from very heavy plastic designed to securely bind the ends of two or more of an individual's Motor Appendages together. Plastic handcuffs prevent a character on which they have been deployed from using any Motor Appendages bound together by the cuffs. They are sundered after sustaining 50 points of Lethal Damage.
Handcuffs (Metal) Metal Age ¤6.50 2 4 A set of nickel-plated manacles designed to securely bind the ends of two of an individual's Motor Appendages together (or more, depending on who manufactured it). Metal Handcuffs prevent a character on which they have been deployed from using any Motor Appendages bound together by the cuffs for any reason (unless attempting to use a mechanical Lock-Picking Kit on them).
Security Kit Industrial Age ¤193.55 8 256 A metal case containing various security-related tools and supplies including a pouch with a Short-Range Communicator, one pair of Metal Handcuffs, six pairs of Zip-Tie Handcuffs, a Terrain-Proof Flashlight, a Vita Kit and other related supplies. It also contains various pouches for holding weapons and tools (1x8, 2x4 and 3x2 pockets). For active police and security forces, the "kit" is more commonly a belt (similar to a Utility Belt; Waist Mount-point) from which various tools and equipment either hang or fit. It allows security personnel easy access to a number of crucial tools in the field).
Security Field Starfaring Age ¤2,419.50 10 1024 Requires Large Battery; uses one charge per minute while operational. A modified Environmental Field Generator designed to deliver an electrical shock to anything that contacts the field (Fifth Class Stun Baton equivalent; automatic hit; uses 10 charges per shock). This effect can be used to both keep things out of an area (such as dangerous wildlife or hostile sapient beings) as well as to keep things within an area (prisoners for example). The projector sits outside its own field. It can cover an area as wide as 50 meters in radius or as narrow as a single meter. It is as effective as a First Class vehicle shield and auto-recharges at the same rate when damaged; its effectiveness increases by one Class level equivalent per ten meters the field is tightened. It has a dual battery bus; the unit can run on one Battery while the other is being replaced.
Vacuum Case Starfaring Age ¤13.00 4 16 A special airtight casing with a compressed oxygen canister designed to fit around the end of a Slugthrower's barrel. When in vacuum or a low atmospheric density environment, the case pumps in the necessary oxygen to allow the weapon to fire normally. It allows a Slugthrower to be used while EVA but can only provide enough air for about ten shots.
Suppressor Industrial Age ¤322.50 0 1 A metallic baffle system designed to attach to the end of a weapon in order to reduce any muzzle flash and sound that may result from its firing, so as not to make such effects readily identifiable as weapon reports. A 1d% roll must be made after firing a weapon shot with the suppressor attached; on a result of 00, the suppressor is rendered useless. It must be attached to a weapon after it is drawn in order to be used; it cannot remain attached while the weapon is holstered. Starfaring Age suppressors completely eliminate all ambient flash and noise from the weapon's firing, cannot be rendered useless and can remain attached while the weapon is holstered. Suppressors may only be used with non-repeating weapons.
Weapon Cleaning/Repair Kit Metal Age ¤13.00 2 4 A case (either wooden, plastic or metal) containing rods, tips, patches, wipes and cleaning solutions designed to keep the bores of ranged weapons clean and to repair them weapons should they become damaged. The kit can be used to repair any weapon that has been rendered inoperative for any reason.
Scope Industrial Age ¤59.75 1† 2† Requires One Appendage. A plastic attachment for a ranged weapon containing a magnifying telescope assembly. It is designed to fold up into a very small space when not in use. If properly focused, the scope allows its user to see much further downrange. It may remain attached to a weapon while it is holstered; it is considered part of the weapon in that case. When used, it grants a +10 bonus to the user's Ranged Attack Bonus in all cases and it allows sniping if it is attached to a weapon with the prerequisite range.
Laser Designator Industrial Age ¤72.50 2† 4† Requires Small Battery; uses 2 charges when activated and one every minute it is operational. A metallic attachment for a ranged weapon containing a low-powered red neon laser designed to substitute for the weapon's sight. It can be seen by the weapon's user downrange at a great distance except in bad weather; the laser can be seen and traced back to the source in foggy or smoky conditions. It may remain attached to a weapon while it is holstered; it is considered part of the weapon in that case. When used under normal conditions, it grants a +25 bonus to the user's Ranged Attack Bonus and it allows sniping if attached to a weapon with the prerequisite range.
Bipod/Tripod Mount Industrial Age ¤32.25 3 8 A metallic stand designed to hold the firing end of a ranged weapon steady while the user is prone or kneeling. Some models come with adjustable legs that allow the user to remain standing while the mount is in use. When attached to a weapon, the mount allows it to be used with one fewer appendage than ordinarily indicated; a minimum of one appendage is always required in order to use a weapon.

Services

Services aren't equipment per se but they do have a monetary cost and have similar game to most pieces of equipment; thus, they will be the last thing discussed in this sub-Chapter. They are best defined as things that a character may not be able to provide for themselves in the short-term based on their current situation, such as when they are travelling. Services include such things as hotel rooms, charter transport and meals. Services employ a unique set of stats. Services are listed in both categories and sub-categories; category indicates a generic type of service while sub-category indicates a specific service within that category. Availability refers to the smallest size of community at which a service becomes available. A service's cost is fairly straightforward though it should be noted that the prices listed for services should be considered average values; depending on a character's location, any available services might cost either substantially more or substantially less. If a service is available only in societies that have achieved a certain technology level, it will be so noted. Finally, since services are not items that can be carried by a character, they do not have ECs, size stats or Motor Appendage requirements.

Services
Category Sub-Category Availability Cost Description
Meal High Quality Large City ¤10.50 / person For meal prices this high, the average sapient can expect good quality service and a professional atmosphere. The food didn't hit the pan until the patron ordered it. The staff will go out of their way to see to it the patron has everything they want as soon as they want it. Angry, foul-mouthed head chefs will scream streams of profanities at their kitchen staff if they commit even the slightest infraction when it comes to the quality of the finished product. It may be the same thing a being can get for a much lower price somewhere else and in some cases they will get more food the lower-priced joint, but nothing really beats a pricy meal for a discussion of important business or a potential romantic encounter.
Moderate Quality Small Town ¤3.25 / person Medium quality meals aren't the best out there, but there is usually more care that goes into the preparation of the food rather than some adolescent heating it up. Medium quality meals may or may not be served in nice restaurants; often if there is a wait staff they will do little more than refill drinks. These places are good when a being wants to go out someplace relatively nice without it costing them a Motor and Propulsive Appendage.
Low Quality All ¤1.50 / person This kind of meal barely fits the definition. Preparation is usually done by adolescents and disgruntled lower-class workers, no wait staff is present for any other reason other than to occasionally clean up after customers and the food is likely not particularly healthy to eat. There is one thing these places have over higher quality joints: they are able to mass produce the food they sell and they are able to prep it and get it out to the customer very quickly; a being that needs to dine and dash would do well to go to this kind of place. Their low overall price is also very attractive.
Vending N/A All ¤0.25† A large, upright rectangular machine designed to dispense goods. The machine typically vends one type of item; the GM should specify what the machine vends before it is used. It can be used to provide one type of low-quality comestible item (either food or drink) or one type of mundane item (such as toiletries). The price of items sold by the machine is solely dependent upon what good is being vended; it is almost always higher it would be to buy the item from a more traditional source.
Transportation Interlunar (High Quality) Metropolis ¤64.50 / hour This price range will get a being to a destination that's either a very long way at a normal level of opulence or a very short way extravagantly. If a being wants to schedule an interlunar flight, this is the only way to go. Some carriers will offer interplanetary or even interstellar charters, though the price listed should be considered an absolute minimum for any such travel. If a being is remaining planetbound, this might be the price for a stretch limousine between cities, a trip in a private luxury aerocraft or a luxury cruise.
Intercontinental (Avg. Quality) Large City ¤27.50 / hour This price range is for those who are seeking intercontinental travel or for those seeking a more opulent way of getting around a given community. Low-quality passenger ships, aircraft and subsurface maglev trains often fall in this category. For those staying local, this would cover the cost of a stretch limousine, a private subway car or an evening's rental of a taxicab.
Intercity (Low Quality) Small City ¤9.75 / hour This range covers modes of transportation that are just slightly better than regular public transportation, covering such things as intercity trains and buses. "Puddle jumper" aircraft can also be found in this category (though they are rarer). For those beings seeking private intra-city travel, this might cover the cost of a regular taxicab or perhaps a low-quality island ferry.
Intra-city (Public) Large Town ¤0.25 Public mass transportation can be a good way to get around an urban area if a being is on a tight budget. This type of transportation includes such things as buses, subways, trams and ferries; express aircraft can sometimes be found in a metropolitan area that flies a route between two local airports, though this is rare and expensive. All of these forms of transportation go only to specific points within a city, so if a being's destination is off the transit route they can still have a substantial walk ahead of them. Nevertheless, it's usually the fastest way to go for those without their own form of transportation.
Freight Small Town ¤806.50 / day Cargo hauling can be a pricy and potentially risky proposition. The price listed is a median value for intercity or intercontinental transportation of standard bulk freight; it can be higher depending upon the amount of freight that needs to be hauled, how much security or safety precautions are needed for the given cargo, whether or not the customer wants a rush delivery and whether or not the cargo is legal based on local statutes. Interlunar or interplanetary freight hauling usually costs substantially more.
Lodging 5-Star Metropolis ¤108.00 / person per night Comparable to a Suite. Top rate rooms are basically small apartments with distinct rooms for sleeping, eating, bathing and entertaining. Standard amenities with this kind of room include a double bed, full walk-in shower, large jetted tub, walk-in closets, work desk, several couches, a full kitchen, a mini bar and a separate dining area; the best suites may even have their own private laundry room or other luxury amenities. These facilities come with full concierge service and 24-hour room service. They are as extravagant as they come and have a price tag to match.
4-Star Large City ¤64.50 / person per night Comparable to a Luxury Stateroom. These rooms are luxurious without being extravagant. Usually they are cordoned off into separate areas for entertaining and sleeping. The bedroom has a full bed, the bathroom has a large jetted tub with separate double shower and the entertainment area has several couches, a large kitchenette and a mini-bar. These facilities often offer concierge service and many offer 24-hour room service. These rooms are a good medium-range choice when a traveler is looking for a little bit of luxury.
3-Star Small City ¤32.25 / person per night Comparable to a Stateroom. Usually the room comes with a double bed, a separate bathroom area with a double shower and a separate jetted tub, a couch and coffee table for lounging and a kitchenette area. Many of these facilities have their own kitchens and offer room service at certain times of the day. Three-star facilities are about the lowest quality a weary traveler can get wherein they can still expect a modicum of opulence.
2-Star Large Town ¤21.00 / person per night Comparable to a Double Cabin. This kind of room may have a double bed, a separate bathroom area with a small tub and either a couch with a coffee table or a table with chairs. The facility usually has a communal dining area that may serve things such as fresh fruits, pastries and other moderate quality foods; some facilities may even have a small restaurant or adjacent diner. The vast majority of travelers stay at these places whenever possible, as they provide comfortable amenities at a fairly reasonable price.
1-Star Small Town ¤8.00 / person per night Comparable to a Single Cabin. This kind of room usually has a single bed, maybe a table and chair and a small bathroom area. Any meals served could be things a being would be able to buy at a nearby convenience store. These facilities are good places for a being to crash when they haven't bothered making reservations at a nicer place ahead of time; they may be the only places available out in the boonies.
0-Star All ¤4.75 / person per night Comparable to a Medium Berth. Four walls, a single bed and not much else. These facilities generally have a communal restroom. If a being is very lucky, the door might have a working lock. Still, for a traveler operating on a very tight budget, it beats a tent in the woods.
Postage Heavy All ¤25.75 / 10kg (200kg max) Postal services are more commonly utilized by planetbound folk, though on occasion someone may need or want to send something to someone either on a ship or on a different planet. Post and parcel services often exist to handle these needs, though what services are available will vary from place to place. The price to send a parcel always depends on how far it has to travel, how fast it needs to get to its destination and how much it weighs; the prices given are for standard intercontinental 3-5 day delivery.
Medium All ¤6.50 / 0.5kg (4.5kg max)
Light All ¤0.25 / 0.05kg (0.5kg max)
Medical Care Major Surgery Small City ¤3,226.00 Major surgery usually requires an extended hospital stay, a potentially long recovery period and the use of some of the most advanced medical equipment available (for example, it's not at all unusual for a patient in a Starfaring Age hospital to be placed in stasis before a major procedure). Surgical procedures whose names end in -ectomy, -ostomy and -otomy usually fit in this category. Facilities where major surgical procedures take place are often found only in major urban areas. The price listed should be considered a median value for such procedures.
Minor Surgery Small Town ¤806.50 Minor surgery generally involves any procedure whose name ends in -oscopy, -oplasty and a few -ectomys. They are procedures that are potentially serious but don't necessarily require an extended hospital stay or the most advanced forms of medical care. As such, minor surgical procedures tend to be available in smaller communities and often don't cost as much as major procedures. The cost listed should be considered an average value for this level of medical care.
Antibiotic Treatment All ¤56.50 A prescription of a series of antibiotic treatments given by a qualified physician. Obviously, the antibiotics must be actually available on the world in question in order for a doctor to prescribe them. This form of treatment can be a lot more expensive than the purchase of a simple autoinjector full of antibiotics but on the other hand the patient is far more likely to get a drug that targets their specific ailment and heal faster as a result.
Routine Physical All ¤40.25 A medical checkup administered by a physician who has been qualified according to the standards of the governing body of the planet in question (someone on a Stone Age world might get an herbalist if they're lucky). This type of medical visit often involves minimally-invasive respiration, reflex and urinalysis tests among others. It can provide a being with significant information regarding the state of their health;  whether or not they choose to act on it is, of course, another matter altogether.
Repairs Vehicle Village ¤322.50/hour† Sometimes a character cannot affect vehicular repairs by themselves, either because they lack the expertise or the materials necessary to do it. At that point, they might have to let someone else do the work. Vehicle repair facilities can often be found planetside on most Industrial Age or Starfaring Age worlds. The price listed is for labor only; parts will cost up to 10% of the vehicle's chassis or the full retail price of the system in question, whichever is higher (use the 10% figure for any system that cannot be purchased or modified independently of the chassis). The ability to replace a destroyed system depends on availability but will always cost the full retail price of the system in question (i.e. putting a First Class Engine on a vehicle as a replacement is always going to cost 10 Cost Points). The time it takes to repair a vehicle equals the highest Class of equipment being repaired in days with a minimum repair time of one day; Starfaring Age shops will perform the work in an equivalent number of hours instead of days.
Capital Ship Large City ¤3,226.00/hour† Starfaring Age. Sometimes the crew of a small capital ship cannot affect repairs by themselves, either because they lack the expertise or the materials necessary; at that point, they might have to let someone else repair the ship. Capital ship repair facilities can often be found planetside on most Starfaring Age worlds and at orbiting space stations. The price listed is for labor only; parts will cost up to 10% of the ship's chassis or the full retail price of the system in question, whichever is higher (use the 10% figure for any system that cannot be purchased or modified independently of the chassis. The ability to replace a destroyed system depends on availability but will always cost the full retail price of the system in question (i.e. putting a First Class Engine on a ship as a replacement is always going to cost ¤10,000). The staff at repair stations will not stop making repairs until either the ship is at 100% across the board or the customer runs out of money. The time it takes to repair a ship equals the highest Class of equipment being repaired in hours with a minimum repair time of one hour. These kinds of repairs are always a very expensive proposition, so much so that most crews will seek this kind of help only as a last resort.

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